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#14: Frank Robinson

Frank Robinson has one accomplishment that no other baseball player can boast about: He is the only player in history to win MVP of both the American and National Leagues!

But wait…there’s more!  Robinson was also named Rookie of the Year, was a 2x MVP, a 14x All Star, a Triple Crown Winner, a World Series MVP, a 2x World Series Winner, and currently sits tenth on the all time home run list (586), he drove in over 1,800 runs, stole 208 bases, and had just shy of 3,000 hits!  He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame inn 1982 and is currently the Honorary President of the American League.

In addition, Robinson was also became the first black manager in the majors when he coached the Cleveland Indians the last two years he played.  He also went on to coach the San Francisco Giants, Bsltimore Orioles and the Montreal Expos/Washington Nationals.

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#60 - Carl Hubbell

Nicknamed “The Meal Ticket” and “King Carl“, Hubbell was a member of the New York Giants in the National League from 1928 to 1943 and  remained on the team’s payroll for the rest of his life, long after their move to San Francisco.

Twice voted the National League’s MVP, Hubbell was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947. During 1936 and 1937, Hubbell set the major league record for consecutive wins by a pitcher with 24 and is perhaps best remembered for his performance in the 1934 All-Star Game, when he struck out five of the game’s great hitters in succession with his primary pitch: the screwball.

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#61 - Roberto Clemente

Roberto Enrique Clemente Walker played 18 seasons for the Pittsburgh Pirates and was posthumously inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973, becoming the first Latin American and Caribbean player to be enshrined. His untimely death from a plane crach while on a Caribbean charity mission established the precedent that, as an alternative to the five-year retirement period, a player who has been deceased for at least six months is eligible for entry into the Hall of Fame.  Yes…he was THAT GOOD!

Clemente was an All-Star for twelve seasons, played in fifteen All-Star Games, was the NL Most Valuable Player in 1966, the NL batting leader in 1961, 1964, 1965, and 1967, and a Gold Glove Award winner for twelve consecutive seasons from 1961 through 1972. His batting average was over .300 for thirteen seasons with 3,000 hits over his major league career. He also played in two World Series championships. Clemente is the first Latin American and Caribbean player to help win a World Series as a starter (1960), to receive an NL MVP Award (1966), and to receive a World Series MVP Award (1971).

He was involved in charity work in Latin American and Caribbean countries during the off-seasons, often delivering baseball equipment and food to those in need. On December 31, 1972, he died in a plane crash while en route to deliver aid to earthquake victims in Nicaragua. He was 38 years old.

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#62 - Adrián Beltré

Among foreign-born players, one name sits at the top when it comes to batting: Adrián Beltré!

What’s he done? Beltré is the fifth major leaguer to hit at least 100 home runs for three different teams, has hit at least 20 home runs in 12 different seasons, and in five seasons, he drove in at least 100 runs. In 2004, he hit a major league-leading 48 home runs while playing for the Dodgers, was the team MVP of the Red Sox in 2010, and tied the major league lead for hits in 2013 while playing for the Rangers. Beltré is the only big leaguer to hit for the cycle three times at the same stadium, Globe Life Park in Arlington. He is the sixth player with a three-home-run game in both the regular season and postseason, and just the second with both a three-home-run game and cycle in the same week. On July 30, 2017, he became the 31st player in MLB history to reach 3,000 hits and the first from the Dominican Republic.

Dimino thinks this is the man to call when a hot bat is needed and it lands him here on his Top 100!

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#63 - Carl "Yaz" Yastrzemski

There are very few “lifers” in the Major Leagues, but Carl “Yaz” Yastrzemski played his entire 23-year baseball career with the Boston Red Sox (1961–1983) and became one of the all time “faces of the franchise.” He was primarily a left fielder, but also played 33 games as a third baseman and mostly was a first baseman and designated hitter later in his career. Yastrzemski is an 18-time All-Star,  woneven Gold Gloves, is a member of the 3,000 hit club, and Yastrzemski was the first American League player in that club to also accumulate over 400 home runs. He is second on the all-time list for games played, third for total at-bats, and the Red Sox’ all-time leader in career RBIs, runs, hits, singles, doubles, total bases, games played, and is third on the team’s list for home runs behind Ted Williams and David Ortiz.

In 1967 Yastrzemski achieved a peak in his career, leading the Red Sox to the American League pennant for the first time in over two decades and was voted the 1967 American League MVP.

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#64: Tris Speaker

Considered one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in the history of Major League Baseball, Tris Speaker compiled a career batting average of .345, HIS 792 career doubles represents an MLB career record, and his 3,514 hits are fifth best all-time. Defensively, Speaker holds career records for assists, double plays, and unassisted double plays by an outfielder. His fielding glove was known as the place “where triples go to die.”

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#65: Frankie Frisch

Frisch played baseball, football, and basketball at Fordham University (New York City) where his speed earned him the name “The Fordham Flash” which stuck with him throughout his baseball career. Frisch went directly before graduating to the Giants in 1919. He played the infield, mainly at second base, through the 1926 season and was then traded to the St. Louis Cardinals, where he played at second and third base through the 1937 season and also managed (1933–38).

He was a switch hitter who hit for an average of .300 or more in 13 of his 19 seasons and over his entire career, was north of .300.

In addition to his solid batting average, Frisch employed his tremendous speed, leading the league in stolen bases for three seasons in 1921 (49), 1927 (48), and in 1931 (28).

He later managed the Pittsburgh Pirates (1940–46) and the Chicago Cubs (1949–51), and became a radio sports broadcaster in the 1940s and a radio and television broadcaster in New York City in the 1950s.

Frisch was voted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947.

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#66 - Reggie Jackson

Nicknamed “Mr. October” for his clutch hitting in the postseason, Reggie Jackson played for the Athletics and the Yankees helping Oakland win five consecutive AL West divisional pennants, three consecutive American League pennants and three consecutive World Series titles, from 1971 to 1975. Jackson also helped New York win four American League East divisional pennants, three American League pennants and two consecutive World Series titles, from 1977 to 1981. He also helped the California Angels win two AL West divisional pennants in 1982 and 1986.

Jackson hit 563 career home runs (He hit three consecutive home runs at Yankee Stadium in the clinching game 6 of the 1977 World Series) and was an American League (AL) All-Star for 14 seasons. He won two Silver Slugger Awards, the AL Most Valuable Player (MVP) Award in 1973, two World Series MVP Awards, and the Babe Ruth Award in 1977. The Yankees and Athletics retired his team uniform number in 1993 and 2004.

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#67 - Al Kaline

Nicknamed “Mr. Tiger“, Kaline played his entire 22-year baseball career with the Detroit Tigers.  During that stretch, he racked up 18 All-Star Game appearances, 10 Gold Gloves, won a batting title and a World Series Title.  Manager Billy Martin once said, “I have always referred to Al Kaline as ‘Mister Perfection’. He does it all – hitting, fielding, running, throwing – and he does it with that extra touch of brilliancy that marks him as a super ballplayer… Al fits in anywhere, at any position in the lineup and any spot in the batting order.

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#68 - Cy Young

Dimino placing the legendary Denton True “Cy” Young at #68 in the Top 100 seems like sacrilege.  After all, Young STILL holds the major league records for most career innings pitched (7,356), most career games started (815), and most complete games (749), but he also retired with 316 losses, the most in MLB history. In addition, Cy Young’s 76 career shutouts are fourth all-time, he won at least 30 games in a season five times, with ten other seasons of 20 or more wins, he pitched three no-hitters, including the third perfect game in baseball history, first in baseball’s “modern era”.  Shouldn’t that put Young in the top 20?  Other sports analysts think so, but ultimately the era that Young played (1890-1911) in may be the reason for his “low” ranking on this list since Dimino has “no barometer” for him. Young played in the “old time” era of baseball where players were only part time and also held full-time jobs.  In a nutshell, Dimino’s thinking Young may have faced a bunch of tomato cans that “padded his stats.”

In a different time, Cy Young might rank higher, but in this one, he’s #68!

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#69 - Wade Boggs

In an 18-year baseball career with the Boston Red Sox, the New York Yankees, and the Tampa Bay Devil Rays, Boggs notched 12 straight All-Star appearances (Third only to Brooks Robinson and George Brett in number of consecutive appearances as a third baseman!), had over 3,000 hits in his career, was a Gold Glove twice, and a Silver Slugger 8X!

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Everybody loves the long ball, but Rod Carew made a hall of fame career even though he only hit 92 over his career.  How?  He was a human hitting machine when he got to the plate with a career featuring over 3,000 hits, a lifetime batting average of .328, led the American League in batting average for 7 years (4 years STRAIGHT from 1972 – 1975), and was an 18X All Star! When it’s all said and done, Carew was the man teams wanted at the plate when runs needed to be driven in!

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#70 - Juan Marichal

191 wins in the 1960’s makes Juan Marichal the winningest pitcher of the 60’s with 197 complete games and an amazing lifetime ERA of 2.89!  He was known for a high leg kick, pinpoint precision with his pitches and no fear of targeting a batter’s head with a pitch to intimidate him! The only thing he’s lacking is a “defining moment” that would allow him to step out from the shadows of other pitchers of the era like Sandy Koufax and Bob Gibson.

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#72 - Jim Thome

Power hitting Thome played 22 seasons in Major League Baseball, from 1991 to 2012 for six different teams, most notably the Cleveland Indians during the 1990s and early 2000s. Thome was prolific at the plate hitting 612 home runs during his career—the eighth-most all time and the second fastest to reach that milestone—along with 2,328 hits, 1,699 runs batted in, and a .276 batting average, was a member of five All-Star teams and won a Silver Slugger Award in 1996.  Most of all, he was a “team player” who was willing to do whatever was asked of him in order to win.

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#73 - Mickey Cochrane

Nicknamed “Black Mike“, Cochrane was a baseball player, manager and coach who playedas a catcher for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. Cochrane was considered one of the best catchers in baseball history and was chosen as the American League’s Most Valuable Player in 1928 and he appeared in the World Series from 1929 to 1931. Cochrane’s career batting average of .320 stood as a record for MLB catchers until 2009. Cochrane’s baseball career as a player ended abruptly after a near-fatal head injury from a bean ball in 1937. After his professional baseball career, he served in the United States Navy in World War II and ran an automobile business.

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#74 - Hank Greenberg

Do NOT let the numbers fool you!  NOTHING you see bout Hank Greenberg’s career numbers says he should be on this list, let alone in the Hall of Fame.  But what the numbers DON’T tel you is that Greenberg gave up three years of his baseball career (1941-1944) to fight in World War 2, having enlisted the day after The Pearl Harbor Attack.  But when he played, he was a dominant force!  He had a lifetime batting average of .313, hit 331 home runs, and drove in over 1200 runs. 
Being of the Jewish faith, Greenberg often was the subject of bigoted insults cast from the fans in the stands.  On one occasion, however, one of his teammates insulted him, but did not reveal his identity.  Greenberg’s response: He stood up in front of his entire team in the locker room and challenged whomever it was who insulted him to reveal his identity.  When nobody responded, he threatened to fight the whole team!  Nobody stood to fight, and nobody on his team ever slung a bigoted slur at him again!

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#75 - Eddie Murray

On the field, Eddie Murray was fantastic!  He was Rookie of the Year, an 8x All-Star, 3x Gold Glove, 8x All Star, hit over 500 home runs, plated almost 2,000 runs, and has been described as the 5th best overall first baseman in history!  Off the field, he had a reputation for being “not such a nice guy,” and on one occasion, even refused to sign a teammate’s baseball.  But since it’s what happens on the diamond that counts, Murray finds himself here at #75 on Dimino’s list.

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#76 - John Smoltz

It’s tough to top Atlanta Braves Pitcher John Smoltz because he’s done just about EVERYTHING a pitcher can do!  Cy Young award?  Check.  World Series Winner?  Check.  15-4 Post Season lifetime record?  Check!  Add in his 8 All Star awards, a Silver Slugger award, and a NLCS MVP…check, check, and CHECK! PLUS:Smoltz began his career as a starter, moved to the bullpen after injury and then RETURNED to the starting rotation at 39 years old, a feat he alone can claim!

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#77 - Monte Irvin

Monte Irvin is probably the best athlete to ever come out of New Jersey having lettered in SIXTEEN sports in high school! One problem though…Irvin played baseball in the days before Jackie Robinson broke the MLB color barrier, so a good chunk of his baseball career was spent in the Negro Leagues. Initially, Irvin played under the name “Jimmy Nelson” because he was playing pro ball while STILL IN HIGH SCHOOL (He needed to maintain his amateur status while making a few bucks on the side!).  Roy Campanella said that Irvin “was the best ball player he had ever seen!

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#78 - Mike Piazza

Another catcher makes the list, and this one was an offensive MONSTER!  Piazza was a decent enough catcher, but it was as a hitter where he stood out!  His lifetime batting average was .308 (Only two catchers ever did better), hit 427 home runs (396 were as a catcher and this is a record for the position!), was Rookie of the Year, a 12x All-Star, a 10x Silver Slugger winner and an inductee into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007.

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#79 - Ichiro

This Japanese import is simply known as “Ichiro” (Last name Suzuki) came into the league at 27, and in his rookie year, he was the league MVP AND Rookie of the Year!  He stands as one of the greatest hitters in the league with 10 consecutive seasons with 200 or more hits, was a 3x Silver Slugger, an 10x All Star, a 10x Gold Glove, he won the batting title twice, has almost 3,100 hits, and had a lifetime batting average over .300.

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#80 - Duke Snider

“The Duke of Flatbush” was named to the National League All-Star roster 8x, was the, he helped lead the Dodgers to six World Series, helping them win 2 (1955 and 1959), was a lifetime .300 hitter, swatted over 400 home runs, and most importantly, he was Mamma Dimino’s FAVORITE player!

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#81 - Charlie Gehringer

Time for a blast from the past!  Charlie Gehringer played his whole career at 2B for the Tigers, and in over 10,000 plate appearances he only struck out 372 times in 10,000+ plate appearances!  Couple that with his 6 All Star Awards, an MVP, a league batting title,  led all American League second basemen in fielding percentage and assists seven times, his 7,068 assists is the second highest total in major league history for a second baseman, he collected 5,369 putouts as a second baseman (the 6th highest total for a second baseman) and 1,444 double plays (the 7th highest total for a second baseman).

Cellini may not be crazy about this choice, but DIMINO SAYS IT STANDS !

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#82 - Johnny Mize

A Georgia boy from Demerest, Johnny Mize (The Big Cat) was the first person to hit 51 home runs in a season with only 42 strikeouts, and the most he ever had in a season was 57!  In addition, he bashed 359 home runs, drove in almost 1400 runs, was a 10x All Star, won a batting title, and was part of a Yankees dynasty at the end of his career that won 5 STRAIGHT World Series! 

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#83 - Vladimir Guerrero

Vladimir Guerrero was a BEAST!  He labored in relative obscurity during the beginning of his career in Montreal, but got the spotlight once he started playing out west with the Anaheim Angels in 2004.  When it was all said and done, Vlad’s career numbers are straight up NASTY with 449 home runs, almost 1500 RBI, was a 9x All Star, an 8x Silver Slugger and was inducted into the Hall of Fame.

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#84 - Craig Biggio

Craig Biggio is an interesting ball player.  He played three positions (2nd Base, Outfield, and Catcher) and taken individually, he was never the best at any one position.  However, when factoring in all three, Biggio’s stats are FILTHY!  He had almost 300 home runs, almost 1200 RBI, over 400 stolen bases, was a 5x Silver Slugger, 4x Gold Glove, and was a 7x All Star.

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#85 - Willie McCovey

Willie McCovey was one of the most intimidating power hitters of his era, and was called “the scariest hitter in baseball” by pitcher Bob Gibson, and “Mr. October Reggie” Jackson concurred. McCovey totaled up 521 home runs which included a home run on September 16, 1966 described as the longest ever hit in San Francisco.  Add to it: Rookie of the Year, a Major League Player of the Year Award, an MVP, a 6X All Star winner, and a Hall of Fame induction.

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#86 - Brooks Robinson

When baseball players are measured for their defensive skills, Brooks Robinson is immediately tops the list for third base!  Robinson won 16 Gold Gloves, was an 18x All Star, an ALCS Championship MVP and World Series MVP.  
Add to that list some decent career offensive numbers and the case is made!

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#87 - Goose Gossage

This reliever is MONEY having recorded the final out in 7 post season games!  In addition, the Goose was an All-Star 9x, has over 300 saves, a lifetime ERA of 3.01 and currently has a bust in Cooperstown.

In the all-important category of “Relievers With Killer Moustaches,” Gossage DEFINITELY has Rollie Fingers’ beat, and that was enough to move him into the #87 slot!

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#88 - Carlton Fisk

Another catcher graces Dimino’s Top 100, and Carlton Fisk is one who defined his position!  It started with his winning “Rookie of the Year,” ended with his induction in the Hall of Fame, and in-between Fisk racked up 3 Silver Sluggers, was an 11x All Star, and won a gold glove!

On a side note, he owns a record as a catcher that will probably never be broken: Fisk once caught 25 Straight Innings!

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#89 - Curt Schilling

Dimino REALLY doesn’t like this guy, but if you’re looking for a beast on the mound, Schilling is the man!  He’s a 6x All Star, a World Series MVP, and a NLCS MVP. A sure bet for a Hall of Fame bust, right?

Maybe not! His mouth is probably keeping him out of Cooperstown! Good thing Schilling appears here!

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#90 - Roy Campanella

Campanella got a late start in the majors at 26 years old, but managed to make up for lost time by racking up 3 MVP Awards, over 240 home runs (An amazing feat for a catcher at that time), and was an 8x All Star.  BONUS: He owned a liquor store.  HOW COOL IS THAT?  Ask Cellini!  He’ll tell you!

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#91 Tom Glavine

The First Atlanta Brave makes his appearance on Dimino’s Top 100 Baseball players of all time, and it’s none other than Hall of Fame Starting Pitcher Tom Glavine! Key Stats: 100+ games over .500, won 2 Cy Young Awards, has a .600 lifetime winning percentage, and was a 4x Silver Slugger! Most impressive was his dominace during baseball’s steroid era when both the baseballs AND opposing hitters were JUICED!

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#92 - Tim Raines

He’s never won an MVP, but Tim Raines has insane stats that dictate his place in this list.  He stole over 800 bases, batted a lifetime .294, and got a ton of walks (which ROCK when you can take second)!  Raines is perhaps the most underrated player on this list, but he’s good enough for #92!

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#93 - Dave Winfield

Dimino thinks that if this survey was for the “Top 100 Athletes in Baseball,” Dave Winfield would probably top the list since he was recruited by MLB, the NFL and NBA.  In this list, Winfield shows some amazing career numbers, but it won’t get him any higher than #93.
And honestly, that aint too shabby!

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#94 - Robin Yount

Bonus points should be awarded to Robin Yount in this Top 100 for being forced to wear those god-awful Milwaukee Brewers Uniforms throughout the 80’s! HOWEVER, since this is NOT a survey of Baseball Fashion Mistakes, he remains at #94.  Dimino would have placed him higher, but feels that there’s some players who are currently active who will probably eclipse Yount’s career numbers. 

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#95 - Jeff Bagwell

Cellini isn’t crazy about this choice because Bagwell had a rep for being a dirty player. Dimino doesn’t care!  ONLY stats dictate admission to this list!  Being a jerk on the diamond is IRRELEVANT.

HOWEVER, if being a jerk WAS the judging criteria, Bagwell would probably show up in the Top 20 in the “Baseball’s Top 100 Jackwagons Survey.”

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#96 - Willie Stargell

The Pittsburgh Pirates’ Willie Stargell shows up here on the list at #96.  Sure, he has the baseball chops to appear in Dimino’s Top 100 Players of All Time and yeah, he’s in Baseball Hall of Fame, but what sets him apart from the others on this list? He’s the only player ever to hit a home run into a Tuba!  Though it’s not an “official stat,” it is impressive because the band was supposed to be out of home run ball range.
THAT’S POWER AT THE PLATE!

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#97 - Ozzie Smith

Dimino picks Ozzie Smith as the 97th best Baseball Player of All Time.  If he was in St. Louis, we’re pretty sure the station would be stormed by irate Cardinals fans brandishing torches and pitchforks who believe Smith should rank higher on the list. 

Guess What: We’re here, they’re there, and Dimino’s sticking to his guns!  97TH IT IS!

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There is NO #98!

#98 - DELETED FOR DRUG TEST FAIL!

LET THE CONTROVERSY BEGIN!  

There is NO #98!

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#99 - Bill Dickey

Dickey was a lifetime New York Yankee both as a player, and a coach!  During his stint on the field, he amassed over 200 home ruins, 1200 RBI, a lifetime batting average over .300, and was an 11X All Star.  In his only season as the Yankees Head Coach, Dickey went 57-48.

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#100 Ralph Kiner

Dimino kicks things off with Ralph Kiner, a ball player who statistically stacks up with some of the biggest names in the game, but whose fame was lessened due to his relatively short baseball career.  Why did Kiner’s name not appear higher on this list?  Play the audio above for the answer!

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MULLIGAN #1 - Rollie Fingers

Dimino had problems adding Rollie Fingers to this list.  There’s one statistic that SHOULD keep Fingers out of Dimino’s top 100, but if it didn’t keep Fingers out of the Baseball Hall of Fame, it aint keeping him out of here!

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